A Dozen Art Books to Get Your Creative Juices Going

Time to look at all sorts of art books: stories, how-to books, and looks at famous works of art. Just reading these books has made me feel a bit more creative! 


 

The
Game of Mix-up Art
by Hervé Tullet

Have
you read Press Here by this author?
Here is another treat. This book contains colorful shapes and patterns on
zigzagged cut-page flaps. Every time you turn a flap, a new picture is created.
This book may very well inspire you to do a Mix-up Art book on your own.

 

 


Ed
Emberley’s Fingerprint Drawing Book
by Ed
Emberley 

All
you need is an ink-pad (washable is good) and your fingers to make art the has
it all: action, expression, humor, story, setting… My favorite is the Feelings
section—amazing!

 

 

Lester
Fizz, Bubble-Gum Artist
by Ruth
Spiro, illustrated by Thor Wickstrom

Everyone
in Lester’s family is an artist…except Lester. He wants to create, but doesn’t seem to have the talent. But then
Uncle Lester (Degas) tells him: What do
you see? What don’t you see? What do you want to see?
This sets Lester on
his way. So what does he use to create his art? Bubble gum!

 

 

Drawing with Your Hands by
Godeleine De Rosamel

Each
picture starts with the outline of your hand. Add a few details and ta-da, it’s
an animal!  This book makes me smile.
It’s part of the series, Drawing is Easy.

 

 

Art
School
by
Mick Manning and Brita Granström

The
authors say you’ll learn two things with this book: how to draw and paint, and how to
see things in new and exciting ways. They give lots of ideas for portraits, life drawing, composition, masks, sculpture,
collage, and more.

 

 

Children’s
Book of Art
by
DK Publishing

You
can spend a long time just looking at the pictures in this book. It covers art
from early history through modern times. There are paintings, sculpture, street
art, prints…a little of most everything. There are also brief artist
biographies.

 

 

What’s the Big Idea?
by
Joyce Raimondo
 

I was so
happy to discover this book. The author shows the work of 6 famous artists and
then makes suggestions for how we can create our own art using their work as
inspiration. This book is part of the Art
Explorers
series.

 

Badly
Drawn Dog
by
Emma Dodson

A
dog (definitely badly drawn) is tired of being badly drawn so he goes to an
artist. The artist re-draws him but there are problems. The artist re-draws him
again and there are still problems. How will the dog solve his problem? His friend
Doodle the Poodle has a rather good idea…

 

Art’s
Supplies
by
Chris Tougas

Art
starts out with, “It’s not my fault!” Evidently, his supplies (paper, crayons,
markers, paints…) decided to have a party and Art has had no control over them.
After a riotous day of creating, who could blame Art for having a messy room?
There are jokes and puns throughout.

 

The
Art Book for Children
by Phaidon
Press

Have
you ever looked at a picture or a sculpture and wondered, “What’s so special
about this?” Sometimes have you wished you just knew a little more about a
piece of art? This book shows us 30 pieces of famous art and gives a little
more information about each—like how it was made or about the history of the
time.  Just paging through this book I
learned quite a bit. One limitation: this book is almost entirely focused on
European and American art.

 

Oxford
First Book of Art
by Gillian Wolfe

This
book shows paintings, drawings, weavings, and sculpture from all over the world.
The works are from ancient times to modern times. Topics include Faces, Figures, Animals, Light and Shade, Patterns, and others. Each double-page spread gives a Look Closer challenge where readers are
asked to search for details in the particular pieces.

 


Shapes in Art by Rebecca
Rissman 

This
is a very basic book. There is a series of photos of artwork and each has a
question asking the reader to find the shape. I appreciate the range of the art: a
painting, sculptures, a stained glass window and others.

 

The Usborne First Book of Art by Rosie Dickens 

I like how this book is designed. Each topic (Faces, Animals, Stories, Weather, Flowers, Places, Patterns) starts out with examples of fine art that shows how some artists showed the topic in their work. These examples are followed by projects kids can try. There is lots of variety in the fun things the projects suggest.

What do you do to get your creative juices flowing? Tell about it in the Comments Box!

Gail



 

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